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UK car crime hotspots revealed

The UK’s motoring crime hotspots have been revealed with drivers in the south-east of England coming out on top as the worst offenders.

One in five (21%) of 2.4 million motoring crimes recorded in the UK between 2015 and 2016 were in the south-east, with the region racking up over 500,000 offences, making it the UK’s driving offence capital.

The data, compiled of Freedom of Information requests obtained by Confused.com, shows south-east drivers to be the worst offenders for a number of motoring-related crimes, including seatbelt offences and driving with defective tyres. However, speeding accounted for 94% of the region’s driving crimes, with a whopping 470,000 speeding offences recorded by police.

Drivers in the north-west and East Anglia were in second and third place, with 288,000 and 275,000 speeding offences, respectively.

Worst regions for motoring offences between 2015-2016

Offence

Region

No. of offences

Defective tyres

south-east

2,359

Drink-driving

north-west

12,344

Drug-driving

north-west

629

Petrol theft

west midlands

6,701

Seatbelt offences

south-east

14,175

Speeding

south-east

476,467

 

North-west drivers also seem to be persistent motoring offenders, committing over 300,000 crimes.

Driving under the influence appears to be most prevalent in this region, with almost 13,000 drink and drug-driving crimes on record.

London follows closely behind on both fronts, with around 12,300 drink-driving offences and 600 drug-driving violations.

Drivers in Scotland meanwhile, recorded almost 9,600 drink driving offences.

When it comes to committing seatbelt offences, drivers in the north-west and London are prolific, with around 7,400 and 7,700 violations recorded respectively. But south-east drivers come out on top – yet again – having committed almost twice as many seatbelt crimes, with 14,200 incidents in total.

When it comes to pinching petrol, police in the west-midlands recorded 6,700 incidents of motorists driving off from fuel stations without paying, followed by 4,900 violations in Yorkshire & Humber and 4,600 in the south-east.

And, while the South-East is also top of the ranks for driving with defective tyres, with 2,400 crimes committed by drivers, East Anglia is not far behind with 1,800 bald tyre offences recorded in the region.

Worst regions for motoring offences between 2015-2016, by rank

Offence

Rank

Region

Speeding

1st

2nd

3rd

south-east

north-west

East Anglia

Drink-driving

1st

2nd

3rd

north-west

London

Scotland

Drug-driving

1st

2nd

3rd

north-west

London

south-east

Petrol theft

1st

2nd

3rd

West Midlands

Yorkshire & Humber

south-east

Seatbelt offences

1st

2nd

3rd

south-east

London

north-west

Defective tyres

1st

2nd

3rd

south-east

East Anglia

Scotland

 

Some regions are more law-abiding than others and do not top the ‘worst’ rankings, but they still rank highly in certain areas. Wales seem to be in the habit of driving without wearing seatbelts, with 5,700 offences recorded by police. And, even though driving crime in Northern Ireland appears to be relatively low, the region still accounts for 67,000 motoring crimes.

 

 

 

 

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Comments

  • GE - 24/02/2017 12:07

    Without reference to the number of drivers in each of the geographic areas, plus the volume of traffic in certain areas eg London and the South East these figures are meaningless (or even just rubbish - sorry).

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  • CGH - 24/02/2017 12:58

    All this report shows is where traffic enforcement still exists.

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  • Bear44 - 25/02/2017 11:35

    This is meaningless! Its the number of offences per 1000 drivers in the region which is a true measure of the level of offending.

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