Fleet News

Road deaths plummet to lowest level in 80 years

ROAD deaths last year were at their lowest level in almost 80 years, but safety campaigners say more action still needs to be taken.

Figures published by the Department for Transport show that 3,221 people died in road accidents in 2004, down 8% on 2003, when 3,508 people were killed.

Transport Minister Stephen Ladyman said the figures were encouraging but warned against complacency.

He said: ‘Nearly nine people a day still died in road accidents last year and that figure is too high. Britain has one of the best road safety records in the world and the Government is committed to improving it further.

‘We are currently taking a Road Safety Bill through Parliament which contains a raft of measures to build on the progress we are making.’

Kevin Clinton, head of road safety at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), said: ‘Enormous efforts have been put in by the Government, local authorities, police camera partnerships and organisations such as RoSPA to save lives.

‘Despite the criticism, speed cameras and traffic calming are extremely effective and we hope people will look at these figures and realise the benefits.’

A spokesman for road safety partnership RoadSafe said: ‘We welcome this confirmation of a continued decline in casualties.However, until the whole community accepts some measure of responsibility, people will continue to be killed and injured.’

  • Fleet Panel, in association with the AA.
  • Leave a comment for your chance to win £20 of John Lewis vouchers.

    Every issue of Fleet News the editor picks his favourite comment from the past two weeks – get involved for your chance to appear in print and win!

    Login to comment

    Comments

    No comments have been made yet.

    Compare costs of your company cars

    Looking to acquire new vehicles? Check how much they'll cost to run with our Car Running Cost calculator.

    What is your BIK car tax liability?

    The Fleet News car tax calculator lets you work out tax costs for both employer and employee