Fleet News

Careers helpline

KEY questions answered by the experts.

Q: I HAVE had various jobs within the motor industry ranging from a car valeter for a major dealership to sales director of a leasing company.

I’m looking to move out of my current job into a totally different area – and preferably one outside the motor industry. If I were to get an interview, how would I explain my decision to switch careers?

A: FIRSTLY, you should write down the skills you have developed in your previous work and leisure time that you will be able to transfer into the new job.

Many employers welcome people from different backgrounds as they can bring a fresh perspective to the role, while making a valuable contribution to the company.

Research as much as you can about the job and company, so you look well informed, and are making your decision to change based on sound research.

Remember to be positive about your previous job, and don’t be tempted to try to justify a move by criticising your previous employer/s, even if that is the case.

People change career direction for many reasons – research has shown that our goals when we leave school, college or university usually differ from those we have as we grow older. Differences can be from wanting a high salary to job satisfaction.

You may also find that life experiences have made you more aware of the opportunities that exist, or that voluntary work or learning has made you realise you missed your calling.

ALISON TAYLOR
Lifelong learning advisor, Learndirect advice line

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