Fleet News

Support for in-car cameras to tackle insurance fraud

UK motorists believe on-board CCTV cameras could stop crash for cash fraudsters in their tracks, research suggests.

Latest figures show that 71% of drivers believe introducing in-car cameras would help cut bogus car insurance claims. 

Vision Unique Equipment (VUE) says it has witnessed a significant reduction in fraudulent insurance claims after installing its technology is thousands of fleet vehicles in the UK.

According to research from the Association of British Insurers, insurance fraud is at a record high, reaching £1.3bn in 2013, with £811million of fraudulent claims attributed to car insurance.

‘Crash for cash’ car insurance scams were identified as the main contributor to a 34% rise on the number of false motoring claims.

Glen Mullins, managing director of VUE, said: “There are approximately 23.3 million private cars on UK roads and fraudulent insurance claims are costing British drivers thousands of pounds each year, as well as driving up premiums. 

“Many ‘crash for cash’ fraudsters have witnesses on hand to claim that the crash was the other driver’s fault, enabling them to make an insurance claim for the damage, as well as whiplash injuries. CCTV technology is the only way to prove what actually happened.”

With two in five drivers claiming they are considering fitting an in-car camera, vehicle CCTV is set to become commonplace on UK roads, claims VUE. 



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