Fleet News

New Mercedes-Benz Citan launched

Citan is the name of the new urban delivery van from Mercedes-Benz. The name was announced for the first time at the Mercedes-Benz Design Centre in Sindelfingen, during a symposium on brand competence and city logistics. The name Citan is derived from the words "City" and "Titan", so emphasising the vehicle’s role as a high-calibre specialist in city logistics, designed specifically for the rough and tumble of everyday working life.

The choice of drive systems comprises a broad range of economical and low-emission diesel and petrol engines – including a BlueEFFICIENCY package. A version powered by an electric engine is already being planned.

The controls, the interior and the quality of materials and workmanship in the new Citan are at the high level that has become the hallmark of all Mercedes-Benz vans. The urban delivery van was developed and tested to the same standards as its larger Sprinter and Vito siblings and is in no way inferior to these. As with every Mercedes-Benz, safety is paramount: ESP is part of the standard specification for all variants.

Considerable variety in terms of the available variants guarantees the new urban delivery van a broad range of potential commercial uses: the Citan is available as a panel van, crewbus or Mixto in various lengths and weight categories.

The market launch of the Citan will take place in the autumn of 2012. It will be on show to the general public for the first time in September at the IAA Commercial Vehicles show in Hanover.

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