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Dräger device receives Home Office approval for roadside drug testing

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Dräger has added to its portfolio of Home Office approved kit, after its drug detection equipment was given the green light for roadside drug testing.

The fully automated Dräger DrugTest 5000, will be used by police forces around the UK, to test for cannabis and cocaine at the roadside – similar to the way drivers are breathalysed for alcohol.

The device can also be used to in a range of industries including transport, logistics and haulage.

The approval comes almost 50 years after Dräger became the first company in the UK to get type approval on a breathalyser – the Alcotest 80 tube in 1967.

The DrugTest 5000 underwent rigorous testing at the Home Office’s centre for applied science and technology (CAST), to confirm its accuracy.

It has been designed for real time usage, with saliva samples able to be analysed immediately for precise results on the spot.

The approval of this mobile device also means officers will no longer have to wait until they are at the police station to test drivers they suspect of being on drugs.

The announcement comes as new drug driving legislation comes into effect, meaning people caught driving under the influence of drugs will face harsher penalties including up to six months’ imprisonment, a £5,000 fine and 12 months’ disqualification.

As well as becoming the first equipment to receive Home Office approval for a drug detection kit used in a custodial setting in 2013, the Dräger DrugTest 5000, which launched in 2009, becomes one of only two kits currently on the market with Type Approval for the roadside testing of cocaine and cannabis.

Policing minister Mike Penning said: “This Government is determined to drive the menace of drug driving from our roads.

“Those who get behind the wheel while under the influence of drugs not only put their own lives at risk, but also those of innocent motorists and their passengers.

“I’m delighted to have type approved the DT5000 for use by the police, which will allow them to more quickly test drivers for cocaine or cannabis - two of the most prevalent types of drugs detected among drug drivers.”

Mark Burrup, Dräger regional segment manager, said: “We are delighted to receive Home Office approval for roadside usage of the Dräger DrugTest 5000.

“As new legislation comes into place early this year, the DrugTest 5000 will have an important role to play in reducing the number of drug-drivers on the road and the impact they have on the safety of others. This is a major step forward and will support the police in their crackdown to bring drug drive criminals to justice.”

The Dräger DrugTest 5000 is already widely used by police forces around the country and the rest of the world, with around 2,000 sold in the UK and approximately 100,000 worldwide.

Whilst operating in real time, the Dräger DrugTest 5000 also has extensive data management capabilities, allowing for up to 400 individual measurements to be stored at any one time.

An integral part of the equipment, this offers longer term solutions for users, with track-able data supporting target areas for enforcement.  

Burrup continued: “We have vast experience working with police forces across the UK and around the world, and the DrugTest 5000 has been designed to support their long term aims and ultimately reduce crime – making our roads safer for everyone who uses them.

“We will continue to work with forces to ensure our solutions deliver real value for money, both today and in the future.”
 


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Comments

  • Mr W - 02/03/2015 15:39

    cocaine cannot be found in saliva so why are the police testing for it?

    • Laila - 03/03/2015 03:03

      @Mr W - sorry to disillusion you but they are actually testing for the chemical that coke turns into in the body. This CAN be found in saliva for up to 24 hours

    • Mr W - 03/03/2015 06:48

      @Laila - your right but they are testing for cocaine not the metabolite found in saliva!! So unless you have just taken cocaine you are very unlikely to find cocaine!

  • laila - 03/03/2015 03:07

    All very well and good but how are they going to test just how much someone has ingested. Is it not like alcohol where there is a limit?

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