Fleet News

Young drivers banned after reaching six points

young driver with car keys in hand

Brake is arguing for graduated driver licences after data showed that, on average, 33 new drivers lost their licence every day after reaching six penalty points.

New drivers face having their licence revoked at the lower threshold within the first two years of passing their driving test.

The data was obtained from the DVLA by a freedom of information request submitted by Brake. The FOI revealed that 11,953 new drivers had their licence revoked under the New Drivers Act in 2018, with drivers aged 17-24 making up almost two thirds (62%) of the total.

Drivers aged 17-24, says Brake, are disproportionately at risk on Britain’s roads. They represent nearly a fifth of all drivers killed and seriously injured on the roads, but make up only 7% of all licence holders.

Under the New Drivers Act, drivers who get six or more penalty points within two years of passing their test have their licence revoked.

If they wish to drive again, they are required to re-apply and pay for a new provisional licence and pass both theory and practical parts of the driving or riding test again.

Brake believes the findings show that more needs to be done to ensure young drivers are safe on the roads.

They are calling for the introduction of a comprehensive graduated driver licensing system across the UK. This system would include a 12-month learner period, an initial test, and then a two-year novice period when drivers can drive independently but with restrictions – such as a late-night driving curfew.

The Government announced in July that graduated driver licensing, which could include not being able to drive at night, is being explored as part of the its road safety action plan to reduce new driver crashes.

The accident management proposal comes in response to a fifth of new drivers crashes within their first year on the road.

Director of campaigns for Brake, Joshua Harris, said: “It’s shocking that so many new drivers are racking up enough penalty points to have their licences revoked so soon after passing their test, in particular those in the 17-24 age bracket.

“It clearly demonstrates that we need to make our licensing system more robust so that when a driver passes their test, they have all the necessary tools and knowledge to drive safely on all roads and in all conditions. Fortunately, there is a proven solution which can deliver this, graduated driver licensing.”

He continued: “The Government’s announcement that they will explore the issue of GDL further is welcome. Swift and decisive action must, however, be taken to introduce GDL across the UK, as a priority to ensure new drivers have the skills and experience they need and to end the tragedy of young people dying on our roads.”

New drivers having their licence revoked within two years of passing their test

Year

Total

2016

9,367

2017

10,719

2018

11,953

Total

32,039

 

2018

 

Age

Total

17

146

18

993

19

1,649

20

1,395

21

1,026

22

839

23

726

24

630

25

612

26

527

27

429

28

381

29

330

30

277

31

249

32

222

33

186

34

182

35

142

36

122

37

109

38

118

39

114

40

64

41

51

42

61

43

68

44

32

45

45

46

31

47

28

48

34

49

19

50

21

51

19

52

10

53

14

54

10

55

9

56

9

57

6

58

2

59

2

60

2

61

4

62

1

63

1

64

2

65

1

67

1

70

1

82

1

Total

11,953



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Comments

  • Edward Handley - 13/09/2019 14:11

    Graduated licensing has been touted as the solution to young drivers problems for many years but no one has ever come up with a convincing and workable plan. As the drivers who get their licences revoked reckless or just unlucky? Is it typically 2 speeding offences or one mobile phone offence? The restrictions proposed such as night time driving bans are simplistic, what about the new driver delayed by traffic or should drivers in Scotland, where it is darker longer in winter, be more restricted than drivers in Southern England? In a way we already have graduated licences, since 1997 people passing the test only get Category B and have to take additional tests for B+E, C1, D1, C1+E, etc, which has put them at a considerable disadvantage in the job market! The Government are keen to recruit young workers into the transport industry which is facing a severe driver shortage. Part of this was the Driver CPC which lowers the age from 21 to 18 so things like curfews and limits on passenger numbers are not workable. And why would a young person invest £3000 in obtaining a vocational licence when two slips in 2 years would see all that taken away? The solution is better training but we need some joined up thinking. Perhaps we should start young people driving at 16 under professional tuition so they can get more training time like they do in France. Instead of points we could be offering remedial training so their licences do not get revoked, because one thing is certain, a lot of those whose licences are revoked do not stop driving, they just turn into outlaws. After all, what have they got to lose?

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