Fleet News

First drive review: Suzuki Swift 4x4 1.2 SZ3

Suzuki
BIK List Price
£13,764
Suzuki Swift 4x4 BIK list price
BIK Percentage
17%
Suzuki Swift 4x4 BIK Percent
CO2
126g/km
Suzuki Swift 4x4 CO2
Combined MPG
51.3
Suzuki Swift 4x4 MPG

Review

Suzuki has decided it wants a piece of the Fiat Panda 4x4’s success, so has joined the niche B-segment 4x4 sector with the launch of its Swift 4x4.

Drivers get a choice of two specifications: the SZ3, which looks like a normal Swift SZ3 apart from a 4x4 badge and a suspension lift of 25mm; and the SZ4, which adds front and rear skid plates, black wheel arch extensions and black side skirts.

The off-road extras fitted to the SZ4 give the Swift a purposeful look, without going over the top.

On the road, the 4x4 feels composed and handles as well as its two-wheel drive counterpart, and better than a cumbersome full-size 4x4.

The 1.2-litre petrol engine isn’t the most powerful and requires drivers to regularly drop down a gear, but emissions of 126g/km and official fuel economy of 51.3mpg will please fleet managers

Although a diesel unit might suit the Swift 4x4 well, Suzuki insists there isn’t demand for it within the UK.

Off-road it’s no mud plugger, but it copes well with potholed tracks – its kerbweight of 1,085kg helping it to pass over obstacles and slippery surfaces with ease.

The 4x4 system is automatic and shifts torque to the rear wheels when extra traction is needed, allowing the driver to concentrate on driving without having to press buttons or pull levers to engage four-wheel drive.

Inside is functional and some of the materials don’t feel as high quality as in many cars this price.

As with the regular Swift you sit high up, but this offers a good view of the road and you soon get used to it.

One of the changes made to the 2013 Suzuki Swift is a string attachment for the parcel shelf – an answer to complaints that it was easy to forget about and it would block rear-view vision when left up.

The boot isn’t the biggest within the segment, but that’s down to the relatively short length but long wheelbase.

Expecting it to be popular with fleets that can’t afford downtime when the country grinds to a halt in the wintry weather, Suzuki offers a winter tyre service which allows tyres to be swapped over and stored at your local dealer or at Suzuki head office in Milton Keynes.

Original estimates suggested Suzuki would sell around 500 Swift 4x4s in the UK within the next 12 months.

Feedback from dealers suggests that this, however, might rise to 1,000.

If practicality is important, the Swift might not cut it within your fleet.

Moving up a segment towards crossovers brings further practicality, but at extra cost.

However, if you’re after a small car that can handle going off the beaten track or keep going when the weather gets rough, the Swift is definitely worth consideration.

By Andrew Brady

Fuel costs
With a combined MPG of 51.3 the Swift 4x4 is one of the most economical ways of tackling tough weather conditions.
CO2 emissions
Emissions of 126g/km are higher than the Panda 4x4's 114, but it comes under the 130 threshold many fleets operate.
Residual values
The Swift 4x4 is likely to retain a premium of £500 over the equivalent 2WD version at three years/60,000 miles. Residuals for the Swift aren't usually as good as some rivals.
Driver appeal
The good looks of the regular Swift combined with the off road extras of the SZ4 means it's an attraction proposition.
Running costs
One of the cheapest ways for going off-road for any fleet, although still suited to light-duty rather than tough stuff.
FN Verdict
The Swift 4x4 is a credible alternative to the Panda. It drives well while returning decent economy figures. The only thing it's lacking is a bit of grunt, and practicality.
Top Speed
N/A
Suzuki Swift 4x4 Top Speed
VED band
N/A
Suzuki Swift 4x4 Ved
Fuel Type
Petrol
Suzuki Swift 4x4 Fuel Type
Residual Value
3 Year 60k : £3,800
4 Year 80k : £2,975
Running Cost (ppm)
3 Year 60k : 31.88
4 Year 80k : 29.28

CO2 emissions and fuel consumption data correct at time of writing. The latest figures are available in the Fleet News fuel cost calculator and the company car tax calculator.

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